Year-In-Review | Sergio Rodriguez

Sergio Rodriguez

Season Stats:

68 G | 22.3 MPG | 7.8 PPG (39.2 FG%) | 36.5 3FG% | 66.7 FT% | 2.3 RPG | 5.1 APG

Three Points:

• After a successful six-year stint overseas with Real Madrid, Rodriguez, a former EuroLeague champion and MVP, returned to the NBA for the first time since the 2009-2010 season. With the Sixers, the 30-year old Spaniard set NBA career-highs in minutes, points, 3-point efficiency, rebounds, and assists.

• During his first four years in the NBA from 2006 through 2010, Rodriguez wasn’t much of a 3-point shooter, connecting on just 110 total triples. He proved to be a productive perimeter threat with Real Madrid, and this past season, translated that skill to the NBA. Rodriguez poured in 92 treys, his 36.5 3-point percentage second-best on the Sixers.

• Signed as a free agent this summer, the veteran Rodriguez began the season as the Sixers’ first-string point guard. He enjoyed a strong start, notching double-digits in points in his first four outings, while also producing four double-figure assist games in November. An ankle injury in Utah on December 29th resulted in Rodriguez falling out of the starting line-up.

Two GIFs:

Much of Rodriguez’s professional career has been built on his reputation as a bouncy, crafty, imaginative passer. His creative ball-handling skills were on display regularly throughout the season, including here, in the Sixers’ December visit to Sacramento.  As Rodriguez shows, if at first you don’t succeed…

No Sixer was utilized as a ball-handler in pick-and-roll sets more frequently than Rodriguez was this season. He did damage in these scenarios, such as in this play (teaming up with Richaun Holmes) from a March victory in Chicago.

One Game:

Rodriguez racked up a season-best 21 points in the Sixers’ 7-point loss at Phoenix on December 23rd. That night, he converted 8 of 12 field goal tries, while matching a career-high 4 3-pointers. The 20-point outing was the third of Rodriguez’s NBA career.

Statement for the Summer:

“It’s going to be first time in a long time that I have more than three weeks of vacation, so I want to take time to recover, disconnect a little bit. I think it’s a good time for me to have a disconnection at this point of my career for 20, 25 days, and then I start working on the things I’m not feeling comfortable, re-establish my body, work on things that during the season you not be able to work.”

Exit Interview:

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